WeedWeek
Social
   

Connect with WeedWeek on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

New Podcast Episode

WeedWeek Podcast
Placeholder Podcast Episode

Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or SoundCloud

1.
   
Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

Cannabis Generates $458M,
2,500 Jobs for Santa Barbara

A preliminary economic impact report from UC Santa Barbara estimates the cannabis industry generates $458M annually for the county economy. The Economic Forecast Project indicates that weed's financial contributions can reach far beyond filling local tax coffers.
Coastal View

  • Growers spend $785,000 per acre on local goods and services, including consulting fees, payroll, and taxes. Yearly, Santa Barbara’s 156 acres of legal grows incur $122M million in expenses.
  • Annually, the average grow employs 16 people, each with an average salary of $65,000. The average payroll cost per acre is nearly $1M.
  • Twenty-five hundred cannabis jobs in Santa Barbara County bring $161M in employee income. Also, the industry “directly supports an additional 2,400 jobs through spending in the local economy and 1,100 indirectly.” The contributions come in the form of supplier and employer activities. 
  • Growers, according to the UC report, cover 51% of their expenses locally.

Quick Hit

  1. Qualifying patients in Berkeley can get MED for free. And marijuana card fees can be waived or even cancelled if one’s income is low enough. These are just some of ways that the poor can more easily access weed.
    WeedMaps

Hey man, don’t bogart that WeedWeek

Click here to share WeedWeek

2.
   

Legalization Brings Rise in
Cali-Canadian Deals

Courtesy of Getty Images

Since legalization hit the The Golden State and Canada, hundreds of millions of dollars have been exchanged between California companies and their analogues up north. And the numbers are growing. Until now, most of these deals have gone unannounced, we could only speculate on the volume of businesshow much business has was being done. A summer report from the Canadian Securities Exchange offers benchmark information.
MJ Biz

Until now, most of these deals have gone unannounced, we could only speculate on the volume of business. A summer report from the Canadian Securities Exchange offers benchmark information.
MJ Biz

  • In the first half of 2019, California companies landed 17% of the $878M transacted between companies listed on the the CSE and American companies. Through 19 financing deals, companies here raised $218M through June.
  • One deal of note was Toronto-based DionyMed's acquisition of cultivation, retail, manufacturing, distribution and delivery properties from MM Esparza 2. The deal paid the Southern California company $13M, plus $6M in stock. 
  • California is the market with a higher ceiling. Analysis from MGO/Ello Alliance found that this year about 20 times more venture capital is being invested in the U.S. than in Canada, $1.2B to $60.5M.

See through the haze of Cannabis Marketing.

Advertise with WeedWeek.net

Click here

3.
   

Mexicans to Collaborate
with Pols on Reform 

Photo by Ana Rojas on Unsplash

In 2018, Mexico ruled weed prohibition unconstitutional. Next week the Senate of that nation will hold public hearings on five different facets of cannabis legalization: public health, human rights, addiction, underage consumption, and the development of medicines from the drug.  Marijuana Moment

  • More than 10 reform bills are under consideration. The legislation most widely expected to pass was introduced by Secretary of the Interior Oldga Sanchez Cordero.
  • Through Thursday citizens can register online to attend the hearings. 
4.
   

Legal Weed Debuts as
Outside Lands Headliner

Photo by Banter Snaps on Unsplash

This weekend's Outside Lands Festival in Golden Gate Park has long been one of the West Coast’s stoniest. As of Wednesday, the three-day event became the state’s first cannabis-permited temporary event. “Brands selling cannabis and festival attendees consuming it at Outside Lands is an extremely significant milestone in the timeline of cannabis acceptance,” said Jetty Extracts’ Chief Marketing Officer Jonathan Forstot.
San Francisco Chronicle

  • A dozen cannabis companies will be positioned in a part of the park that’s being called Grass Lands. San Francisco regulations call for consumption areas to being set apart and hidden.
  • Despite the festival starting on Friday, prospective vendors did not know the licensing outcome until two day prior. “I’m in the cannabis business,” said Chelby Dufourg of the Grass Lands sponsor F/eld. “So, uncertainty is kind of my thing.”
  • Fans are able to buy up to 7 grams of flower and two grams of concentrates.

Quick Hit

  1. In the trial of a man accused of kidnapping, torturing, and sexually mutilating an Orange County dispensary owner, the defendant testified that he escaped from prison before his trial only because he was “being railroaded.“ Prosecutors claim the combative defendant and two friends invaded a home where the Newport Beach entrepreneur was staying with intentions of taking $1M that the businessman didn’t actually have and then forcing him and a woman into a van. 
    OC Register  
5.
   

An Expungement Clinc comes
to the San Fernando Valley

The National Diversity & Inclusion Cannabis Alliance (NDICA) has a free ecworkshop set for Saturday at the Canoga Park Employment Development office.
NDICA

6
   

Newsom Advisor Grilled on
San Diego Podcast 

Photo by Alex Hu on Unsplash

WeedWeek admires the work of senior Capitol adviser Nicole Elliott, from her broadly revered work as San Francisco’s top cannabis regulator to her willingness to face tough questions from at-best confused audiences all around the state. But last weekend an Elliott podcast session with a couple of surly and spottily-informed San Diego newspapermen made us concerned for her as well.
San Diego Union-Tribune/SoundCloud

  • The curiously-unnamed podcast team first took Elliott to task for “The Wack-a-Mole of shutting down these shops,” arguing that targeting landlords works better. She countered by outlining resources and measures the state deployed as a means to slow down illicit cannabis. “Thoughtful enforcement," she told them, is only part of a holistic plan. 
  • The nearly-21-minute interview additionally touches on Weedmaps advertising complaints and delivery services, which operate with relative freedom, despite most counties opposing marijuana sales. “Do you accept the interpretation that delivery services should be allowed to go anywhere?” As with Weedmaps, Elliott couldn’t comment in specifics. “Just because yo chosen not to participate in the regulated market doesn’t lead to a lack of unregulated activity in your jurisdiction."
  • Correction: Off-air -- and by off-air we mean on Twitter -- Elliot corrected an item in last week's newsletter that said the state's social equity grants would be awarded next May. In fact the grants may be as late as the end of June, but can go out earlier. She added that the Governor's budget for equity grants has been raised by $30M. We regret the error.
7.
   

How Does Cannabis Affect Workplace Rights?

Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash

"Your Legal Rights" host Jeff Hayden, a criminal law specialist, on Tuesday had labor advisor Jonathan Judge and Danielle Lucido examine how legalization law and workplace law intersect. 
KALW

  • Hayden asked what an employees rights would be if the person attended a cannabis conference and posted non-consumption photos on Facebook, and then a co-worker reported the posting to management? Judge answered that, while each posted picture is its own thing, state labor rules on off-duty conduct ought to protect the targeted employee’s position. Whether the posting can lawfully block promotion opportunities is a more complicated question.
  • Random tests here are generally limited to workers with safety concerns. (Think construction workers and ambulance drivers.) “Outside of that, you aren’t going to get a lot of drug testing,” Judge said.

Quick Hit

  1. Moe Greens is an old-school San Francisco space with a 21st-century twist: Only medicated food and drink is sold, but you can bring your regular old pizza and sandwiches into its Playground, Vault, and High Roller rooms. Each offers a different consumption experience.
    MG Retailer
8.
   

Cops & Troops Roll Out
Humboldt’s Week of Warrants 

Courtesy of Getty Images

Humboldt County has about 10,000 grows. Less than a third are legal. This week the county’s Marijuana Eradication Team joined up with National Guard troops as part of a continuing effort to make plants that conform the only plants in the state for sale. They went from grow to grow with search warrants.
North Coast Journal

  • In executing five searches on August 5, according to the Sheriff’s Office, the dual forces served four search warrants that led to the taking of 3,100 plants from 13 greenhouses.
  • One grower who expressed uncertainty over whether a convoy of law enforcement vehicles might be coming for his property. “We were in a gray area,” he said. “The state temp license had expired but the property has valid county permits. The state is slow."
9.
   

PR Unraveling Is Latest
MedMen Chin Scratcher

Courtesy of Getty Images

In March, Culver-City-based multi-state operator MedMen connected with the public relations firm MWWPR about overseeing a consumer P.R. account. Despite reservations, the decades-old firm bid for Med Men’s business and was subsequently awarded the work in June. Two weeks later, the cannabis company killed the deal.  
PR Week

  • MWWPR won the account on June 12. According to PR Week, MWWPR flew staffers to L.A. for meetings with their new client’s execs, as a means of outlining plans. The cancellation followed shortly after.
  • Michael Kemper, the PR company’s CEO said, “In my 32 years of CEO of MWWPR, this was clearly one of the more dishonest and odd processes we have experienced.”
  • Azione, the Los Angeles company that previously handled Med Men’s consumer P.R., had not bid on the job. Medmen representatives didn’t respond to PR Week’s requests for comment.

Are you over 21?

Please enter your date of birth to continue